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The Westway: West London’s concrete tributary, an artery carrying traffic into and out of the centre of the city. It is estimated that approximately 5,000 families lost their homes for each mile of the Westway constructed. As a child living locally in the 70s, the undeveloped space near Royal Oak was a rough playing ground; later I used to cycle this passage to school every day. During my first term studying architecture at Manchester University at a ’40 under 40’ event I made a collage of the potential use for the space underneath as a sculpture park which was published in the Architects Journal. The area to the left in this picture has now all been developed into the Paddington Basin with luxury flats and offices. Development has cut off the shafts of light visible here.

The Westway: West London’s concrete tributary, an artery carrying traffic into and out of the centre of the city. It is estimated that approximately 5,000 families lost their homes for each mile of the Westway constructed. As a child living locally in the 70s, the undeveloped space near Royal Oak was a rough playing ground; later I used to cycle this passage to school every day. During my first term studying architecture at Manchester University at a ’40 under 40’ event I made a collage of the potential use for the space underneath as a sculpture park which was published in the Architects Journal. The area to the left in this picture has now all been developed into the Paddington Basin with luxury flats and offices. Development has cut off the shafts of light visible here.

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Greyscore:Trellick Tower is another iconic Brutalist landmark in West London. This was exhibited at the Courtauld Institute East Wing Biennial 1999-2001 and looks at rhythms of light and occupation on the façade. I exhibited ‘Greyscore’ and ‘Westway’ at ‘Highrise’ 1997 on the top floor of the building and was featured in a channel 4 programme ’Slave’ alongside work by the grandson of the building’s architect, Ernö Goldfinger.

Greyscore:Trellick Tower is another iconic Brutalist landmark in West London. This was exhibited at the Courtauld Institute East Wing Biennial 1999-2001 and looks at rhythms of light and occupation on the façade. I exhibited ‘Greyscore’ and ‘Westway’ at ‘Highrise’ 1997 on the top floor of the building and was featured in a channel 4 programme ’Slave’ alongside work by the grandson of the building’s architect, Ernö Goldfinger.

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Windows inside the service tower of Trellick 1997 (negative from Analogue)

Windows inside the service tower of Trellick 1997 (negative from Analogue)

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Windows inside the service tower of Trellick 1997 (from Analogue)

Windows inside the service tower of Trellick 1997 (from Analogue)

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Southbank 2005 (from Analogue) Abstract shapes from the Southbank; I returned here many times to capture the geometries at their best point as the light changed throughout the days and months.

Southbank 2005 (from Analogue) Abstract shapes from the Southbank; I returned here many times to capture the geometries at their best point as the light changed throughout the days and months.

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Southbank 2005 (from analogue) Contrast and colours have been manipulated to exaggerate the brutal quality of the architecture and explore negative space.

Southbank 2005 (from analogue) Contrast and colours have been manipulated to exaggerate the brutal quality of the architecture and explore negative space.

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Southbank 2005 (from analogue) Geometries in negative space are explored. Pencil lines play with the lines of perspective to create another layer of geometries.

Southbank 2005 (from analogue) Geometries in negative space are explored. Pencil lines play with the lines of perspective to create another layer of geometries.

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Westway and Greyscore
1. The Westway: West London’s concrete tributary, an artery carrying traffic into and out of the centre of the city. It is estimated that approximately 5,000 families lost their homes for each mile of the Westway constructed. As a child living locally in the 70s, the undeveloped space near Royal Oak was a rough playing ground; later I used to cycle this passage to school every day.

During my first term studying architecture at Manchester University at a ’40 under 40’ event I made a collage of the potential use for the space underneath as a sculpture park which was published in the Architects Journal. The area to the left in this picture has now all been developed into the Paddington Basin with luxury flats and offices. Development has cut off the shafts of light visible here.

2. Greyscore: Trellick Tower is another iconic Brutalist landmark in West London. This was exhibited at the Courtauld Institute East Wing Biennial 1999-2001 and looks at rhythms of light and occupation on the façade. I exhibited ‘Greyscore’ and ‘Westway’ at ‘Highrise’ 1997 on the top floor of the building and was featured in a channel 4 programme ’Slave’ alongside work by the grandson of the building’s architect, Ernö Goldfinger.

3. Windows inside the service tower of Trellick 1997 (negative from Analogue)

4. Windows inside the service tower of Trellick 1997 (from Analogue)

5. Southbank 2005 (from Analogue) Abstract shapes from the Southbank; I returned here many times to capture the geometries at their best point as the light changed throughout the days and months.

6. Southbank 2005 (from analogue) Contrast and colours have been manipulated to exaggerate the brutal quality of the architecture and explore negative space.

7. Southbank 2005 (from analogue) Geometries in negative space are explored. Pencil lines play with the lines of perspective to create another layer of geometries.